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Creators/Authors contains: "Yuan, Zhe"

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  1. Abstract

    The angular dependence of the microwave-driven spin rectification (SR) effect in single crystalline Co0.5Fe0.5alloy film is systematically investigated. Due to the strong current-orientation dependent anisotropic magnetoresistance (AMR), the SR effects in CoFe film strongly deviate from the ordinary sin 2φMcosφMrelation withφMdefined as the magnetization angle away from the current. A giant Gilbert damping anisotropy in the CoFe film with a maximum–minimum ratio of 520% is observed, which can impose a strong anisotropy onto magnetic susceptibility. The observed unusual angular dependence can be well explained by the theory including current-orientation dependent AMR and anisotropic magnetic susceptibility. Our work also suggests that the strong current-orientation dependent AMR in single crystalline CoFe film could exist up to the gigahertz frequency range.

  2. Abstract

    Optical density (OD) is widely used to estimate the density of cells in liquid culture, but cannot be compared between instruments without a standardized calibration protocol and is challenging to relate to actual cell count. We address this with an interlaboratory study comparing three simple, low-cost, and highly accessible OD calibration protocols across 244 laboratories, applied to eight strains of constitutive GFP-expressingE. coli. Based on our results, we recommend calibrating OD to estimated cell count using serial dilution of silica microspheres, which produces highly precise calibration (95.5% of residuals  <1.2-fold), is easily assessed for quality control, also assesses instrument effective linear range, and can be combined with fluorescence calibration to obtain units of Molecules of Equivalent Fluorescein (MEFL) per cell, allowing direct comparison and data fusion with flow cytometry measurements: in our study, fluorescence per cell measurements showed only a 1.07-fold mean difference between plate reader and flow cytometry data.