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  1. Abstract

    Transition metal alloys are essential for magnetic recording, memory, and new materials-by-design applications. Saturation magnetization in these alloys have previously been measured by conventional techniques, for a limited number of samples with discrete compositions, a laborious and time-consuming effort. Here, we propose a method to construct complete saturation magnetization diagrams for Co–Fe–Ni alloys using scanning Hall probe microscopy (SHPM). A composition gradient was created by the diffusion multiple technique, generating a full combinatorial materials library with an identical thermal history. The composition and crystallographic phases of the alloys were identified by integrated energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and electron backscatter diffraction. “Pixel-by-pixel” perpendicular components of the magnetic field were converted into maps of saturation magnetization using the inversion matrix technique. The saturation magnetization dependence for the binary alloys was consistent with the Slater-Pauling behavior. By using a significantly denser data point distribution than previously available, the maximum of the Slater-Pauling curve for the Co–Fe alloys was identified at ~ 32 at% of Co. By mapping the entire ternary diagram of Co–Fe–Ni alloys recorded in a single experiment, we have demonstrated that SHPM—in concert with the combinatorial approach—is a powerful high-throughput characterization tool, providing an effective metrology platform to advance the search formore »new magnetic materials.

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  2. The diffusion behavior and phase equilibria in the Cu-Zn binary system were investigated using solid-solid and solid-liquid diffusion couples. Heat treatments at temperatures ranging from 100 to 750 °C were performed and the samples were examined using optical microscopy, energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, and electron probe microanalysis to identify the phases and to obtain composition profiles. Solubility limits of both solid solution and intermetallic phases were then evaluated, and a forward-simulation analysis (FSA) was applied to extract interdiffusion coefficients. The composition profiles from Hoxha et al. were also re-analyzed using FSA to obtain more reliable diffusion coefficient data without the assumption of constant diffusion coefficients for the intermetallic phases. A comprehensive assessment of the interdiffusion coefficients in three intermetallic phases of the Cu-Zn system was performed based on the results from the current study as well as those in the literature. Activation energies and Arrhenius pre-factors were evaluated for each phase as a function of composition. The fitted equations based on the comprehensive assessment have the capabilities of computing the interdiffusion coefficients of each of the phase at a given composition and temperature. Suggested modifications to the Cu-Zn binary phase diagram were presented based on the new experimental information gatheredmore »from the present study. A clear explanation is provided for the puzzling low Zn concentrations often observed in the Cu-rich fcc phase of Cu-Zn diffusion couples in comparison with the expected high solubility values based on the equilibrium Cu-Zn phase diagram.« less
  3. Ceramics are an important class of materials with widespread applications because of their high thermal, mechanical, and chemical stability. Computational predictions based on first principles methods can be a valuable tool in accelerating materials discovery to develop improved ceramics. It is essential to experimentally confirm the material properties of such predictions. However, materials screening rates are limited by the long processing times and the poor compositional control from volatile element loss in conventional ceramic sintering techniques. To overcome these limitations, we developed an ultrafast high-temperature sintering (UHS) process for the fabrication of ceramic materials by radiative heating under an inert atmosphere. We provide several examples of the UHS process to demonstrate its potential utility and applications, including advancements in solid-state electrolytes, multicomponent structures, and high-throughput materials screening.
  4. Abstract

    The Materials Genome Initiative (MGI) advanced a new paradigm for materials discovery and design, namely that the pace of new materials deployment could be accelerated through complementary efforts in theory, computation, and experiment. Along with numerous successes, new challenges are inviting researchers to refocus the efforts and approaches that were originally inspired by the MGI. In May 2017, the National Science Foundation sponsored the workshop “Advancing and Accelerating Materials Innovation Through the Synergistic Interaction among Computation, Experiment, and Theory: Opening New Frontiers” to review accomplishments that emerged from investments in science and infrastructure under the MGI, identify scientific opportunities in this new environment, examine how to effectively utilize new materials innovation infrastructure, and discuss challenges in achieving accelerated materials research through the seamless integration of experiment, computation, and theory. This article summarizes key findings from the workshop and provides perspectives that aim to guide the direction of future materials research and its translation into societal impacts.