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  1. Multi-layered inter-dependent networks have emerged in a wealth of high-impact application domains. Cross-layer dependency inference, which aims to predict the dependencies between nodes across different layers, plays a pivotal role in such multi-layered network systems. Most, if not all, of existing methods exclusively follow a coupling principle of design and can be categorized into the following two groups, including (1) heterogeneous network embedding based methods (data coupling), and (2) collaborative filtering based methods (module coupling). Despite the favorable achievement, methods of both types are faced with two intricate challenges, including (1) the sparsity challenge where very limited observations of cross-layer dependencies are available, resulting in a deteriorated prediction of missing dependencies, and (2) the dynamic challenge given that the multi-layered network system is constantly evolving over time. In this paper, we first demonstrate that the inability of existing methods to resolve the sparsity challenge roots in the coupling principle from the perspectives of both data coupling and module coupling. Armed with such theoretical analysis, we pursue a new principle where the key idea is to decouple the within-layer connectivity from the observed cross-layer dependencies. Specifically, to tackle the sparsity challenge for static networks, we propose FITO-S, which incorporates a positionmore »embedding matrix generated by random walk with restart and the embedding space transformation function. More essentially, the decoupling principle ameliorates the dynamic challenge, which naturally leads to FITO-D, being capable of tracking the inference results in the dynamic setting through incrementally updating the position embedding matrix and fine-tuning the space transformation function. Extensive evaluations on real-world datasets demonstrate the superiority of the proposed framework FITO for cross-layer dependency inference.« less
    Free, publicly-accessible full text available October 17, 2023
  2. Graph Convolutional Network (GCN) has exhibited strong empirical performance in many real-world applications. The vast majority of existing works on GCN primarily focus on the accuracy while ignoring how confident or uncertain a GCN is with respect to its predictions. Despite being a cornerstone of trustworthy graph mining, uncertainty quantification on GCN has not been well studied and the scarce existing efforts either fail to provide deterministic quantification or have to change the training procedure of GCN by introducing additional parameters or architectures. In this paper, we propose the first frequentist-based approach named JuryGCN in quantifying the uncertainty of GCN, where the key idea is to quantify the uncertainty of a node as the width of confidence interval by a jackknife estimator. Moreover, we leverage the influence functions to estimate the change in GCN parameters without re-training to scale up the computation. The proposed JuryGCN is capable of quantifying uncertainty deterministically without modifying the GCN architecture or introducing additional parameters. We perform extensive experimental evaluation on real-world datasets in the tasks of both active learning and semi-supervised node classification, which demonstrate the efficacy of the proposed method.
    Free, publicly-accessible full text available August 14, 2023
  3. Teams can be often viewed as a dynamic system where the team configuration evolves over time (e.g., new members join the team; existing members leave the team; the skills of the members improve over time). Consequently, the performance of the team might be changing due to such team dynamics. A natural question is how to plan the (re-)staffing actions (e.g., recruiting a new team member) at each time step so as to maximize the expected cumulative performance of the team. In this paper, we address the problem of real-time team optimization by intelligently selecting the best candidates towards increasing the similarity between the current team and the high-performance teams according to the team configuration at each time-step. The key idea is to formulate it as a Markov Decision process (MDP) problem and leverage recent advances in reinforcement learning to optimize the team dynamically. The proposed method bears two main advantages, including (1) dynamics, being able to model the dynamics of the team to optimize the initial team towards the direction of a high-performance team via performance feedback; (2) efficacy, being able to handle the large state/action space via deep reinforcement learning based value estimation. We demonstrate the effectiveness of themore »proposed method through extensive empirical evaluations.« less
  4. Multi-sourced networks naturally appear in many application domains, ranging from bioinformatics, social networks, neuroscience to management. Although state-of-the-art offers rich models and algorithms to find various patterns when input networks are given, it has largely remained nascent on how vulnerable the mining results are due to the adversarial attacks. In this paper, we address the problem of attacking multi-network mining through the way of deliberately perturbing the networks to alter the mining results. The key idea of the proposed method (ADMIRING) is effective influence functions on the Sylvester equation defined over the input networks, which plays a central and unifying role in various multi-network mining tasks. The proposed algorithms bear two main advantages, including (1) effectiveness, being able to accurately quantify the rate of change of the mining results in response to attacks; and (2) generality, being applicable to a variety of multi-network mining tasks ( e.g., graph kernel, network alignment, cross-network node similarity) with different attacking strategies (e.g., edge/node removal, attribute alteration).
  5. State-of-the-art in network science of teams offers effective recommendation methods to answer questions like who is the best replacement, what is the best team expansion strategy, but lacks intuitive ways to explain why the optimization algorithm gives the specific recommendation for a given team optimization scenario. To tackle this problem, we develop an interactive prototype system, Extra, as the first step towards addressing such a sense-making challenge, through the lens of the underlying network where teams embed, to explain the team recommendation results. The main advantages are (1) Algorithm efficacy: we propose an effective and fast algorithm to explain random walk graph kernel, the central technique for networked team recommendation; (2) Intuitive visual explanation: we present intuitive visual analysis of the recommendation results, which can help users better understand the rationality of the underlying team recommendation algorithm.