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  1. Sentiment classification typically relies on a large amount of labeled data. In practice, the availability of labels is highly imbalanced among different languages, e.g., more English texts are labeled than texts in any other languages, which creates a considerable inequality in the quality of related information services received by users speaking different languages. To tackle this problem, cross-lingual sentiment classification approaches aim to transfer knowledge learned from one language that has abundant labeled examples (i.e., the source language, usually English) to another language with fewer labels (i.e., the target language). The source and the target languages are usually bridged throughmore »off-the-shelf machine translation tools. Through such a channel, cross-language sentiment patterns can be successfully learned from English and transferred into the target languages. This approach, however, often fails to capture sentiment knowledge specific to the target language, and thus compromises the accuracy of the downstream classification task. In this paper, we employ emojis, which are widely available in many languages, as a new channel to learn both the cross-language and the language-specific sentiment patterns. We propose a novel representation learning method that uses emoji prediction as an instrument to learn respective sentiment-aware representations for each language. The learned representations are then integrated to facilitate cross-lingual sentiment classification. The proposed method demonstrates state-of-the-art performance on benchmark datasets, which is sustained even when sentiment labels are scarce.« less
  2. Emojis have quickly become a universal language that is used by worldwide users, for everyday tasks, across language barriers, and in different apps and platforms. The prevalence of emojis has quickly attracted great attentions from various research communities such as natural language processing, Web mining, ubiquitous computing, and human-computer interaction, as well as other disciplines including social science, arts, psychology, and linguistics. This talk summarizes the recent efforts made by my research group and our collaborators on analyzing large-scale emoji data.
  3. Machine learning on graph structured data has attracted much research interest due to its ubiquity in real world data. However, how to efficiently represent graph data in a general way is still an open problem. Traditional methods use handcraft graph features in a tabular form but suffer from the defects of domain expertise requirement and information loss. Graph representation learning overcomes these defects by automatically learning the continuous representations from graph structures, but they require abundant training labels, which are often hard to fulfill for graph-level prediction problems. In this work, we demonstrate that, if available, the domain expertise usedmore »for designing handcraft graph features can improve the graph-level representation learning when training labels are scarce. Specifically, we proposed a multi-task knowledge distillation method. By incorporating network-theory-based graph metrics as auxiliary tasks, we show on both synthetic and real datasets that the proposed multi-task learning method can improve the prediction performance of the original learning task, especially when the training data size is small.« less
  4. We consider a family of problems that are concerned about making predictions for the majority of unlabeled, graph-structured data samples based on a small proportion of labeled samples. Relational information among the data samples, often encoded in the graph/network structure, is shown to be helpful for these semi-supervised learning tasks. However, conventional graph-based regularization methods and recent graph neural networks do not fully leverage the interrelations between the features, the graph, and the labels. In this work, we propose a flexible generative framework for graph-based semi-supervised learning, which approaches the joint distribution of the node features, labels, and the graphmore »structure. Borrowing insights from random graph models in network science literature, this joint distribution can be instantiated using various distribution families. For the inference of missing labels, we exploit recent advances of scalable variational inference techniques to approximate the Bayesian posterior. We conduct thorough experiments on benchmark datasets for graph-based semi-supervised learning. Results show that the proposed methods outperform the state-of-the-art models in most settings.« less
  5. We conduct a large-scale, systematic study to evaluate the existing evaluation methods for natural language generation in the context of generating online product reviews. We compare human-based evaluators with a variety of automated evaluation procedures, including discriminative evaluators that measure how well machine-generated text can be distinguished from human-written text, as well as word overlap metrics that assess how similar the generated text compares to human-written references. We determine to what extent these different evaluators agree on the ranking of a dozen of state-of-the-art generators for online product reviews. We find that human evaluators do not correlate well with discriminativemore »evaluators, leaving a bigger question of whether adversarial accuracy is the correct objective for natural language generation. In general, distinguishing machine-generated text is challenging even for human evaluators, and human decisions correlate better with lexical overlaps. We find lexical diversity an intriguing metric that is indicative of the assessments of different evaluators. A post-experiment survey of participants provides insights into how to evaluate and improve the quality of natural language generation systems.« less