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  1. Autonomous mobile robots (AMRs) have the capability to execute a wide range of tasks with minimal human intervention. However, one of the major limitations of AMRs is their limited battery life, which often results in interruptions to their task execution and the need to reach the nearest charging station. Optimizing energy consumption in AMRs has become a critical challenge in their deployment. Through empirical studies on real AMRs, we have identified a lack of coordination between computation and control as a major source of energy inefficiency. In this paper, we propose a comprehensive energy prediction model that provides real-time energy consumption for each component of the AMR. Additionally, we propose three path models to address the obstacle avoidance problem for AMRs. To evaluate the performance of our energy prediction and path models, we have developed a customized AMR called Donkey, which has the capability for fine-grained (millisecond-level) end-to-end power profiling. Our energy prediction model demonstrated an accuracy of over 90% in our evaluations. Finally, we applied our energy prediction model to obstacle avoidance and guided energy-efficient path selection, resulting in up to a 44.8% reduction in energy consumption compared to the baseline. 
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  2. Electric Vehicle (EV) charging recommendation that both accommodates user preference and adapts to the ever-changing external environment arises as a cost-effective strategy to alleviate the range anxiety of private EV drivers. Previous studies focus on centralized strategies to achieve optimized resource allocation, particularly useful for privacy-indifferent taxi fleets and fixed-route public transits. However, private EV driver seeks a more personalized and resource-aware charging recommendation that is tailor-made to accommodate the user preference (when and where to charge) yet sufficiently adaptive to the spatiotemporal mismatch between charging supply and demand. Here we propose a novel Regularized Actor-Critic (RAC) charging recommendation approach that would allow each EV driver to strike an optimal balance between the user preference (historical charging pattern) and the external reward (driving distance and wait time). Experimental results on two real-world datasets demonstrate the unique features and superior performance of our approach to the competing methods. 
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  3. Amini, MR ; Canu, S. ; Fischer, A. ; Guns, T. ; Kralj Novak, P. ; Tsoumakas, G. (Ed.)
    Electric Vehicle (EV) charging recommendation that both accommodates user preference and adapts to the ever-changing external environment arises as a cost-effective strategy to alleviate the range anxiety of private EV drivers. Previous studies focus on centralized strategies to achieve optimized resource allocation, particularly useful for privacy-indifferent taxi fleets and fixed-route public transits. However, private EV driver seeks a more personalized and resource-aware charging recommendation that is tailor-made to accommodate the user preference (when and where to charge) yet sufficiently adaptive to the spatiotemporal mismatch between charging supply and demand. Here we propose a novel Regularized Actor-Critic (RAC) charging recommendation approach that would allow each EV driver to strike an optimal balance between the user preference (historical charging pattern) and the external reward (driving distance and wait time). Experimental results on two real-world datasets demonstrate the unique features and superior performance of our approach to the competing methods. 
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  4. We design a parallel algorithm for the Constrained Shortest Path (CSP) problem. The CSP problem is known to be NP-hard and there exists a pseudo-polynomial time sequential algorithm that solves it. To design the parallel algorithm, we extend the techniques used in the design of the Δ-stepping algorithm for the single-source shortest paths problem. 
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