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  1. Impact Statement The structure of social and organizational relationships in commercial building workplaces is a key component of work processes. Understanding this structure—typically described as a network of relational ties—can help designers of workspaces and managers of workplaces make decisions that promote the success of organizations. These networks are complex, and as a result, our traditional means of measuring them are time and cost intensive. In this paper, we present a novel method, the Interaction Model, for learning these network structures automatically through sensing data. When we compare the learned network to network data obtained through a survey, we find statistically significant correlation, demonstrating the success of our method. Two key strengths of our proposed method are, first, that it uncovers network patterns quickly, requiring just 10 weeks of data, and, second, that it is interpretable, relying on intuitive opportunities for social interaction. Data-driven inference of the structure of human systems within our built environment will enable the design and operation of engineered built spaces that promote our human-centered objectives.