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  1. Abstract

    Research has conclusively demonstrated the potential for dispersal evolution in range expansions and shifts, however the degree of dispersal evolution observed has varied substantially among organisms. Further, it is unknown how the factors influencing dispersal evolution might impact other ecological processes at play. We use an individual-based model to investigate the effects of the underlying genetics of dispersal and mode of reproduction in range expansions and shifts. Consistent with predictions from stationary populations, dispersal evolution increases with sexual reproduction and loci number. Contrary to our predictions, however, increased dispersal does not always improve a population’s ability to track changing conditions. The mate finding Allee effect inherent to sexual reproduction increases extinction risk during range shifts, counteracting the beneficial effect of increased dispersal evolution. Our results demonstrate the importance of considering both ecological and evolutionary processes for understanding range expansions and shifts.

  2. Free, publicly-accessible full text available June 1, 2023
  3. Free, publicly-accessible full text available June 1, 2023
  4. Adler, Frederick (Ed.)
    Free, publicly-accessible full text available May 1, 2023
  5. Mordecai, Erin (Ed.)
    Free, publicly-accessible full text available April 1, 2023
  6. Mean annual temperature and mean annual precipitation drive much of the variation in productivity across Earth's terrestrial ecosystems but do not explain variation in gross primary productivity (GPP) or ecosystem respiration (ER) in flowing waters. We document substantial variation in the magnitude and seasonality of GPP and ER across 222 US rivers. In contrast to their terrestrial counterparts, most river ecosystems respire far more carbon than they fix and have less pronounced and consistent seasonality in their metabolic rates. We find that variation in annual solar energy inputs and stability of flows are the primary drivers of GPP and ER across rivers. A classification schema based on these drivers advances river science and informs management.
    Free, publicly-accessible full text available February 22, 2023
  7. Enquist, Brian (Ed.)
    Free, publicly-accessible full text available January 1, 2023
  8. Free, publicly-accessible full text available January 1, 2023
  9. Free, publicly-accessible full text available January 1, 2023