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Title: Fatigue Behavior and Cyclic Deformation of Additive Manufactured NiTi
The aim of this study is to experimentally investigate the fatigue behavior of additively manufactured (AM) NiTi (i.e. Nitinol) specimens and compare the results to the wrought material. Additive manufacturing is a technique in which components are fabricated in a layer-by-layer additive process using a sliced CAD model based on the desired geometry. NiTi rods were fabricated in this study using Laser Engineered Net Shaping (LENS), a Direct Laser Deposition (DLD) AM technique. Due to the high plateau stress of the as-fabricated NiTi, all the AM specimens were heat-treated to reduce their plateau stress, close to the one for the wrought material. Two different heat treatment processes, resulting in different stress plateaus, were employed to be able to compare the results in stress- and strain-based fatigue analysis. Straincontrolled constant amplitude pulsating fatigue experiments were conducted on heat-treated AM NiTi specimens at room temperature (~24°C) to investigate their cyclic deformation and fatigue behavior. Fatigue lives of AM NiTi specimens were observed to be shorter than wrought material specifically in the high cycle fatigue regime. Fractography of the fracture surface of fatigue specimens using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) revealed the presence of microstructural defects such as voids, resulting from entrapped gas or more » lack of fusion and serving as crack initiation sites, to be the main reason for the shorter fatigue lives of AM NiTi specimens. However, the maximum stress level found to be the most influential factor in the fatigue behavior of superelastic NiTi. « less
Authors:
; ;
Award ID(s):
1660446
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10043713
Journal Name:
Journal of materials processing technology
ISSN:
0924-0136
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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