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Title: Ultra Low-Cycle Fatigue Behavior Comparison between Additively Manufactured and Rolled 17-4 PH (AISI 630) Stainless Steels
This study investigates the mechanical behavior of additively manufactured (AM) 17-4 PH (AISI 630) stainless steels and compares their behavior to traditionally produced wrought counterparts. The goal of this study is to understand the key parameters influencing AM 17-4 PH steel fatigue life under ULCF conditions and to develop simple predictive models for fatigue-life estimation in AM 17-4 steel components. In this study, both AM and traditionally produced (wrought) material samples are fatigue tested under fully reversed (R = −1) strain controlled (2–4% strain) loading and characterized using micro-hardness, x-ray diffraction, and fractography methods. Results indicate decreased fatigue life for AM specimens as compared to wrought 17-4 PH specimens due to fabrication porosity and un-melted particle defect regions which provide a mechanism for internal fracture initiation. Heat treatment processes performed in this work, to both the AM and wrought specimens, had no observable effect on ULCF behavior. Result comparisons with an existing fatigue prediction model (the Coffin–Manson universal slopes equation) demonstrated consistent over-prediction of fatigue life at applied strain amplitudes greater than 3%, likely due to inherent AM fabrication defects. An alternative empirical ULCF capacity equation is proposed herein to aid future fatigue estimations in AM 17-4 PH stainless steel components.  more » « less
Award ID(s):
1751699
NSF-PAR ID:
10333363
Author(s) / Creator(s):
; ;
Date Published:
Journal Name:
Metals
Volume:
11
Issue:
11
ISSN:
2075-4701
Page Range / eLocation ID:
1726
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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