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Title: An efficient parallel simulation of unsteady blood flows in patient-specific pulmonary artery
Simulation of blood flows in the pulmonary artery provides some insight into certain diseases by examining the relationship between some continuum metrics, e.g., the wall shear stress acting on the vascular endothelium, which responds to flow-induced mechanical forces by releasing vasodilators/constrictors. V. Kheyfets, in his previous work, studies numerically a patient-specific pulmonary circulation to show that decreasing wall shear stress is correlated with increasing pulmonary vascular impedance. In this paper, we develop a scalable parallel algorithm based on domain decomposition methods to investigate an unsteady model with patient-specific pulsatile waveforms as the inlet boundary condition.
Authors:
; ; ;
Award ID(s):
1720366
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10057874
Journal Name:
International journal for numerical methods in biomedical engineering
ISSN:
2040-7939
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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