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Title: Cybersecurity Analysis of an IEEE 802.15.4 based Wireless Sensor Network for Smart Grid Power Monitoring on a Naval Vessel
Most sensor networks on a naval vessel are wired directly to the control unit, and this includes the Power System. This paper demonstrates how an IEEE 802.15.4 based Wireless Sensor Network (WSN) could be used to have an easy to deploy, flexible and affordable Smart Grid Power System monitoring structure. In published literature, it has been qualitatively proven that a WSN can work on a ship, despite its more complex Radio Frequency (RF) environment. This work quantifies this, showing the achievable levels of Packet Error Rate under different levels of Signal to Interference and Noise Ratio, proving that it could be used instead of a wired channel. Another important aspect studied was the cybersecurity implications of using a wireless network versus a wired one. The effects of delayed, missing and faked power measurements were also done, along with a discussion of what could be done to detect and mitigate these effects.  more » « less
Award ID(s):
1730140
NSF-PAR ID:
10065073
Author(s) / Creator(s):
; ; ; ;
Date Published:
Journal Name:
ASNE Technology Systems and Ships (TSS)
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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