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Title: Improved Massively Parallel Computation Algorithms for MIS, Matching, and Vertex Cover
We present O(log logn)-round algorithms in the Massively Parallel Computation (MPC) model, with ˜O(n) memory per machine, that compute a maximal independent set, a 1 + ε approximation of maximum matching, and a 2 + ε approximation of minimum vertex cover, for any n-vertex graph and any constant ε > 0. These improve the state of the art as follows: • Our MIS algorithm leads to a simple O(log log Δ)-round MIS algorithm in the CONGESTED-CLIQUE model of distributed computing, which improves on the ˜O (plog Δ)-round algorithm of Ghaffari [PODC’17]. • OurO(log logn)-round (1+ε)-approximate maximum matching algorithm simplifies or improves on the following prior work: O(log2 logn)-round (1 + ε)-approximation algorithm of Czumaj et al. [STOC’18] and O(log logn)-round (1 + ε)- approximation algorithm of Assadi et al. [arXiv’17]. • Our O(log logn)-round (2+ε)-approximate minimum vertex cover algorithm improves on an O(log logn)-round O(1)- approximation of Assadi et al. [arXiv’17].
Authors:
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Award ID(s):
1740751 1733808 1741137 1650733
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10065947
Journal Name:
Proceedings of the 37th ACM Principles of Distributed Computing (PODC 2018)
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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