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Title: Electrode control methodology for a scanning tunneling microscope
A control methodology for scanning tunneling microscopy is disclosed. Instead of utilizing Integral-based control systems, the methodology utilizes a dual-control algorithm to direct relative advancement of a STM tip towards a sample. A piezo actuator and stepper motor advances an STM tip towards a sample at a given distance until measuring a current greater than or equal to a desired setpoint current. Readings of the contemporaneous step are analyzed to direct the system to change continue or change direction and also determine the size of each step. In simulations where Proportion and/or Integral control methodology was added to the algorithm the stability of the feedback control is decreased. The present methodology accounts for temperature variances in the environment and also appears to clean and protect the tip electrode, prolonging its useful life.
Authors:
Award ID(s):
1648811
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10066868
Journal Name:
U.S. patentSearch claims & abstracts
ISSN:
1069-3645
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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