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Title: Testing phase space properties of synchronous dynamical systems with nested canalyzing local functions.
Discrete graphical dynamical systems serve as effective formal models in many contexts, including simulations of agent-based models, propagation of contagions in social networks and study of biological phenomena. A class of Boolean functions, called nested canalyzing functions (NCFs), has been used as a good model of certain biological phenomena. Motivated by these biological applications, we study a variety of analysis problems for synchronous graphical dynamical systems (SyDSs) over the Boolean domain, where each local function is an NCF. Each analysis problem involves testing whether the phase space of a given SyDS satisfies a certain property. We present intractability results for some properties as well as efficient algorithms for others. In several cases, our results clearly delineate intractable and efficiently solvable versions of problems
Authors:
; ; ;
Award ID(s):
1633028
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10067760
Journal Name:
AAMAS 2018
Page Range or eLocation-ID:
1585-1594
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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