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Title: A multiscale approach to balance trade-offs among dam infrastructure, river restoration, and cost

Aging infrastructure and growing interests in river restoration have led to a substantial rise in dam removals in the United States. However, the decision to remove a dam involves many complex trade-offs. The benefits of dam removal for hazard reduction and ecological restoration are potentially offset by the loss of hydroelectricity production, water supply, and other important services. We use a multiobjective approach to examine a wide array of trade-offs and synergies involved with strategic dam removal at three spatial scales in New England. We find that increasing the scale of decision-making improves the efficiency of trade-offs among ecosystem services, river safety, and economic costs resulting from dam removal, but this may lead to heterogeneous and less equitable local-scale outcomes. Our model may help facilitate multilateral funding, policy, and stakeholder agreements by analyzing the trade-offs of coordinated dam decisions, including net benefit alternatives to dam removal, at scales that satisfy these agreements.

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ;
Award ID(s):
1539071
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10078939
Journal Name:
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Volume:
115
Issue:
47
Page Range or eLocation-ID:
p. 12069-12074
ISSN:
0027-8424
Publisher:
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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