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Title: Unidirectional response in spin-torque driven magnetization dynamics
It was recently demonstrated in bilayers of permalloy and platinum, that by combining spin torques arising from the spin Hall effect with Oersted field-like torques, magnetization dynamics can be induced with a directional preference.1 This “unidirectional” magnetization dynamic effect is made possible by exploiting the different even and odd symmetry that damping-like and field-like torques respectively have when magnetization is reversed. The experimental method used to demonstrate this effect was the spin-torque ferromagnetic (ST-FMR) resonance technique; a popular tool used in the phenomenological quantification of a myriad of damping-like and field-like torques. In this report, we review the phenomenology which is used to describe and analyze the unidirectional magnetization dynamic effect in ST-FMR measurements. We will focus on how the asymmetry in the dynamics also is present in the phase angle of the magnetization precession. We conclude by demonstrating a utility of this directional effect; we will outline an improved experimental method that can be used to distinguish a phase-shifted field-like torque in a ST-FMR experiment from a combination of field-like and damping-like torques.
Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ;
Award ID(s):
1720633
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10092657
Journal Name:
Proceedings of SPIE
Volume:
10732
Page Range or eLocation-ID:
37
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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