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Title: Correlation between scale-invariant normal-state resistivity and superconductivity in an electron-doped cuprate
An understanding of the normal state in the high-temperature superconducting cuprates is crucial to the ultimate understanding of the long-standing problem of the origin of the superconductivity itself. This so-called “strange metal” state is thought to be associated with a quantum critical point (QCP) hidden beneath the superconductivity. In electron-doped cuprates—in contrast to hole-doped cuprates—it is possible to access the normal state at very low temperatures and low magnetic fields to study this putative QCP and to probe the T ➔ 0 K state of these materials. We report measurements of the low-temperature normal-state magnetoresistance (MR) of the n-type cuprate system La 2− x Ce x CuO 4 and find that it is characterized by a linear-in-field behavior, which follows a scaling relation with applied field and temperature, for doping ( x ) above the putative QCP ( x = 0.14). The magnitude of the unconventional linear MR decreases as T c decreases and goes to zero at the end of the superconducting dome ( x ~ 0.175) above which a conventional quadratic MR is found. These results show that there is a strong correlation between the quantum critical excitations of the strange metal state and the high- T c more » superconductivity. « less
Authors:
; ; ; ;
Award ID(s):
1708334
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10096476
Journal Name:
Science Advances
Volume:
5
Issue:
5
Page Range or eLocation-ID:
eaav6753
ISSN:
2375-2548
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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