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Title: Cu( i )–O 2 oxidation reactions in a fluorinated all-O-donor ligand environment
Investigation of Cu–O 2 oxidation reactivity is important in biological and anthropogenic chemistry. Zeolites are one of the most promising Cu/O based oxidation catalysts for development of industrial-scale CH 4 to CH 3 OH conversion. Their oxidation mechanisms are not well understood, however, highlighting the importance of the investigation of molecular Cu( i )–O 2 reactivity with O-donor complexes. Herein, we give an overview of the synthesis, structural properties, and O 2 reactivity of three different series of O-donor fluorinated Cu( i ) alkoxides: K[Cu(OR) 2 ], [(Ph 3 P)Cu(μ-OR) 2 Cu(PPh 3 )], and K[(R 3 P)Cu(pin F )], in which OR = fluorinated monodentate alkoxide ligands and pin F = perfluoropinacolate. This breadth allowed for the exploration of the influence of the denticity of the ligand, coordination number, the presence of phosphine, and K⋯F/O interactions on their O 2 reactivity. K⋯F/O interactions were required to activate O 2 in the monodentate-ligand-only family, whereas these connections did not affect O 2 activation in the bidentate complexes, potentially due to the presence of phosphine. Both families formed trisanionic, trinuclear cores of the form {Cu 3 (μ 3 -O) 2 } 3− . Intramolecular and intermolecular substrate oxidation were also explored more » and found to be influenced by the fluorinated ligand. Namely, {Cu 3 (μ 3 -O) 2 } 3− from K[Cu(OR) 2 ] could perform both monooxygenase reactivity and oxidase catalysis, whereas those from K[(R 3 P)Cu(pin F )] could only perform oxidase catalysis. « less
Authors:
;
Award ID(s):
1800313
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10097315
Journal Name:
Dalton Transactions
Volume:
48
Issue:
15
Page Range or eLocation-ID:
4759 to 4768
ISSN:
1477-9226
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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