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Title: Variability Timescale and Spectral Index of Sgr A* in the Near Infrared: Approximate Bayesian Computation Analysis of the Variability of the Closest Supermassive Black Hole
Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ;
Award ID(s):
1716327
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10101362
Journal Name:
The Astrophysical Journal
Volume:
863
Issue:
1
Page Range or eLocation-ID:
15
ISSN:
1538-4357
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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