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Title: Using Quantization to Deploy Heterogeneous Nodes in Two-Tier Wireless Sensor Networks
We study a heterogeneous two-tier wireless sensor network in which N heterogeneous access points (APs) collect sensing data from densely distributed sensors and then forward the data to M heterogeneous fusion centers (FCs). This heterogeneous node deployment problem is modeled as a quantization problem with distortion defined as the total power consumption of the network. The necessary conditions of the optimal AP and FC node deployment are explored in this paper. We provide a variation of Voronoi diagrams as the optimal cell partition for this network, and show that each AP should be placed between its connected FC and the geometric center of its cell partition. In addition, we propose a heterogeneous two-tier Lloyd-like algorithm to optimize the node deployment. Simulation results show that our proposed algorithm outperforms the existing methods like Minimum Energy Routing, Agglomerative Clustering, and Divisive Clustering, on average.
Authors:
; ;
Award ID(s):
1815339
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10108983
Journal Name:
IEEE International Symposium on Information Theory (ISIT-19)
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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