skip to main content

Title: Repression of turnip crinkle virus replication by its replication protein p88
We recently reported that p28, one of the two turnip crinkle virus (TCV) replication proteins, trans-complemented a defective TCV lacking p28, yet repressed the replication of another TCV replicon encoding wildtype p28 (Zhang et al., 2017). Here we show that p88, the TCV-encoded RNA-dependent RNA polymerase, likewise trans-complemented a p88-defective TCV replicon, but repressed one encoding wild-type p88. Surprisingly, lowering p88 protein levels enhanced trans-complementation, but weakened repression. Repression by p88 was not simply due to protein over-expression, as deletion mutants missing 127 or 224 N-terminal amino acids accumulated to higher levels but were poor repressors. Finally, both trans-complementation and repression by p88 were accompanied by preferential accumulation of subgenomic RNA2, and a novel class of small TCV RNAs. Our results suggest that repression of TCV replication by p88 may manifest a viral mechanism that regulates the ratio of genomic and subgenomic RNAs based on p88 abundance.
Authors:
; ; ; ;
Award ID(s):
1758912
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10113000
Journal Name:
Virology
Volume:
526
Page Range or eLocation-ID:
165-172
ISSN:
0042-6822
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
More Like this
  1. We recently reported that p28, one of the two turnip crinkle virus (TCV) replication proteins, trans-complemented a defective TCV lacking p28, yet repressed the replication of another TCV replicon encoding wildtype p28 (Zhang et al., 2017). Here we show that p88, the TCV-encoded RNA-dependent RNA polymerase, likewise trans-complemented a p88-defective TCV replicon, but repressed one encoding wild-type p88. Surprisingly, lowering p88 protein levels enhanced trans-complementation, but weakened repression. Repression by p88 was not simply due to protein over-expression, as deletion mutants missing 127 or 224 N-terminal amino acids accumulated to higher levels but were poor repressors. Finally, both trans-complementation andmore »repression by p88 were accompanied by preferential accumulation of subgenomic RNA2, and a novel class of small TCV RNAs. Our results suggest that repression of TCV replication by p88 may manifest a viral mechanism that regulates the ratio of genomic and subgenomic RNAs based on p88 abundance.« less
  2. RNA secondary structures play diverse roles in positive-sense (+) RNA virus infections, but those located with the replication protein coding sequence can be difficult to investigate. Structures that regulate the translation of replication proteins pose particular challenges, as their potential involvement in post-translational steps cannot be easily discerned independent of their roles in regulating translation. In the current study, we attempted to overcome these difficulties by providing viral replication proteins in trans. Specifically, we modified the plant-infecting turnip crinkle virus (TCV) into variants that are unable to translate one (p88) or both (p28 and p88) replication proteins, and complemented theirmore »replication with the corresponding replication protein(s) produced from separate, non-replicating constructs. This approach permitted us to re-examine the p28/p88 coding region for potential RNA elements needed for TCV replication. We found that, while more than a third of the p88 coding sequence could be deleted without substantially affecting viral RNA levels, two relatively small regions, known as RSE and IRE, were essential for robust accumulation of TCV genomic RNA, but not subgenomic RNAs. In particular, the RSE element, found previously to be required for regulating the translational read-through of p28 stop codon to produce p88, contained sub-elements needed for efficient replication of the TCV genome. Application of this new approach in other viruses could reveal novel RNA secondary structures vital for viral multiplication.« less
  3. Simon, Anne E. (Ed.)
    ABSTRACT Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) of virus origin accumulate in cells infected by many positive-strand (+) RNA viruses to bolster viral infectivity. Their biogenesis mostly utilizes exoribonucleases of host cells that degrade viral genomic or subgenomic RNAs in the 5′-to-3′ direction until being stalled by well-defined RNA structures. Here, we report a viral lncRNA that is produced by a novel replication-dependent mechanism. This lncRNA corresponds to the last 283 nucleotides of the turnip crinkle virus (TCV) genome and hence is designated tiny TCV subgenomic RNA (ttsgR). ttsgR accumulated to high levels in TCV-infected Nicotiana benthamiana cells when the TCV-encoded RNA-dependentmore »RNA polymerase (RdRp), also known as p88, was overexpressed. Both (+) and (−) strand forms of ttsgR were produced in a manner dependent on the RdRp functionality. Strikingly, templates as short as ttsgR itself were sufficient to program ttsgR amplification, as long as the TCV-encoded replication proteins p28 and p88 were provided in trans . Consistent with its replicational origin, ttsgR accumulation required a 5′ terminal carmovirus consensus sequence (CCS), a sequence motif shared by genomic and subgenomic RNAs of many viruses phylogenetically related to TCV. More importantly, introducing a new CCS motif elsewhere in the TCV genome was alone sufficient to cause the emergence of another lncRNA. Finally, abolishing ttsgR by mutating its 5′ CCS gave rise to a TCV mutant that failed to compete with wild-type TCV in Arabidopsis . Collectively, our results unveil a replication-dependent mechanism for the biogenesis of viral lncRNAs, thus suggesting that multiple mechanisms, individually or in combination, may be responsible for viral lncRNA production. IMPORTANCE Many positive-strand (+) RNA viruses produce long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) during the process of cellular infections and mobilize these lncRNAs to counteract antiviral defenses, as well as coordinate the translation of viral proteins. Most viral lncRNAs arise from 5′-to-3′ degradation of longer viral RNAs being stalled at stable secondary structures. Here, we report a viral lncRNA that is produced by the replication machinery of turnip crinkle virus (TCV). This lncRNA, designated ttsgR, shares the terminal characteristics with TCV genomic and subgenomic RNAs and overaccumulates in the presence of moderately overexpressed TCV RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp). Furthermore, templates that are of similar sizes as ttsgR are readily replicated by TCV replication proteins (p28 and RdRp) provided from nonviral sources. In summary, this study establishes an approach for uncovering low abundance viral lncRNAs, and characterizes a replicating TCV lncRNA. Similar investigations on human-pathogenic (+) RNA viruses could yield novel therapeutic targets.« less
  4. Dutch, Rebecca Ellis. (Ed.)
    ABSTRACT Opium poppy mosaic virus (OPMV) is a recently discovered umbravirus in the family Tombusviridae . OPMV has a plus-sense genomic RNA (gRNA) of 4,241 nucleotides (nt) from which replication protein p35 and p35 extension product p98, the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp), are expressed. Movement proteins p27 (long distance) and p28 (cell to cell) are expressed from a 1,440-nt subgenomic RNA (sgRNA2). A highly conserved structure was identified just upstream from the sgRNA2 transcription start site in all umbraviruses, which includes a carmovirus consensus sequence, denoting generation by an RdRp-mediated mechanism. OPMV also has a second sgRNA of 1,554 nt (sgRNA1) thatmore »starts just downstream of a canonical exoribonuclease-resistant sequence (xrRNA D ). sgRNA1 codes for a 30-kDa protein in vitro that is in frame with p28 and cannot be synthesized in other umbraviruses. Eliminating sgRNA1 or truncating the p30 open reading frame (ORF) without affecting p28 substantially reduced accumulation of OPMV gRNA, suggesting a functional role for the protein. The 652-nt 3′ untranslated region of OPMV contains two 3′ cap-independent translation enhancers (3′ CITEs), a T-shaped structure (TSS) near its 3′ end, and a Barley yellow dwarf virus -like translation element (BTE) in the central region. Only the BTE is functional in luciferase reporter constructs containing gRNA or sgRNA2 5′ sequences in vivo , which differs from how umbravirus 3′ CITEs were used in a previous study. Similarly to most 3′ CITEs, the OPMV BTE links to the 5′ end via a long-distance RNA-RNA interaction. Analysis of 14 BTEs revealed additional conserved sequences and structural features beyond the previously identified 17-nt conserved sequence. IMPORTANCE Opium poppy mosaic virus (OPMV) is an umbravirus in the family Tombusviridae . We determined that OPMV accumulates two similarly sized subgenomic RNAs (sgRNAs), with the smaller known to code for proteins expressed from overlapping open reading frames. The slightly larger sgRNA1 has a 5′ end just upstream from a previously predicted xrRNA D site, identifying this sgRNA as an unusually long product produced by exoribonuclease trimming. Although four umbraviruses have similar predicted xrRNA D sites, only sgRNA1 of OPMV can code for a protein that is an extension product of umbravirus ORF4. Inability to generate the sgRNA or translate this protein was associated with reduced gRNA accumulation in vivo . We also characterized the OPMV BTE structure, a 3′ cap-independent translation enhancer (3′ CITE). Comparisons of 13 BTEs with the OPMV BTE revealed additional stretches of sequence similarity beyond the 17-nt signature sequence, as well as conserved structural features not previously recognized in these 3′ CITEs.« less
  5. Biogenesis of viral replication organelles (VROs) is critical for replication of positive-strand RNA viruses. In this work, we demonstrate that tomato bushy stunt virus (TBSV) and the closely related carnation Italian ringspot virus (CIRV) hijack the retromer to facilitate building VROs in the surrogate host yeast and in plants. Depletion of retromer proteins, which are needed for biogenesis of endosomal tubular transport carriers, strongly inhibits the peroxisome-associated TBSV and the mitochondria-associated CIRV replication in yeast andin planta.In vitro reconstitution revealed the need for the retromer for the full activity of the viral replicase. The viral p33 replication protein interacts withmore »the retromer complex, including Vps26, Vps29, and Vps35. We demonstrate that TBSV p33-driven retargeting of the retromer into VROs results in delivery of critical retromer cargoes, such as 1) Psd2 phosphatidylserine decarboxylase, 2) Vps34 phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K), and 3) phosphatidylinositol 4-kinase (PI4Kα-like). The recruitment of these cellular enzymes by the co-opted retromer is critical for de novo production and enrichment of phosphatidylethanolamine phospholipid, phosphatidylinositol-3-phosphate [PI(3)P], and phosphatidylinositol-4-phosphate [PI(4)P] phosphoinositides within the VROs. Co-opting cellular enzymes required for lipid biosynthesis and lipid modifications suggest that tombusviruses could create an optimized lipid/membrane microenvironment for efficient VRO assembly and protection of the viral RNAs during virus replication. We propose that compartmentalization of these lipid enzymes within VROs helps tombusviruses replicate in an efficient milieu. In summary, tombusviruses target a major crossroad in the secretory and recycling pathways via coopting the retromer complex and the tubular endosomal network to build VROs in infected cells.

    « less