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Title: Bounding Network-Induced Delays of Wireless PRP Infrastructure for Industrial Control Systems
Recently, wireless communication technologies, such as Wireless Local Area Networks (WLANs), have gained increasing popularity in industrial control systems (ICSs) due to their low cost and ease of deployment, but communication delays associated with these technologies make it unsuitable for critical real-time and safety applications. To address concerns on network-induced delays of wireless communication technologies and bring their advantages into modern ICSs, wireless network infrastructure based on the Parallel Redundancy Protocol (PRP) has been proposed. Although application-specific simulations and measurements have been conducted to show that wireless network infrastructure based on PRP can be a viable solution for critical applications with stringent delay performance constraints, little has been done to devise an analytical framework facilitating the adoption of wireless PRP infrastructure in miscellaneous ICSs. Leveraging the deterministic network calculus (DNC) theory, we propose to analytically derive worst-case bounds on network- induced delays for critical ICS applications. We show that the problem of worst-case delay bounding for a wireless PRP network can be solved by performing network-calculus-based analysis on its non-feedforward traffic pattern. Closed-form expressions of worst-case delays are derived, which has not been found previously and allows ICS architects/designers to compute worst- case delay bounds for ICS tasks in their more » respective application domains of interest. Our analytical results not only provide insights into the impacts of network-induced delays on latency- critical tasks but also allow ICS architects/operators to assess whether proper wireless RPR network infrastructure can be adopted into their systems. « less
Authors:
;
Award ID(s):
1646458 2146968
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10120463
Journal Name:
ICC 2019 - 2019 IEEE International Conference on Communications (ICC)
Page Range or eLocation-ID:
1 to 7
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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