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Title: Quantum Phase Transition in Strongly-Correlated Cavity Polaritons
We study the quantum critical behavior in a multiconnected Jaynes-Cummings lattice using the density-matrix renormalization group method, where cavity polaritons exhibit a Mott-insulator-to-superfluid phase transition. We calculate the phase boundaries and the quantum critical points.  more » « less
Award ID(s):
0956064
NSF-PAR ID:
10125895
Author(s) / Creator(s):
; ; ;
Date Published:
Journal Name:
IEEE Conference Proceeding for Asia Communications and Photonics Conference 2018
Page Range / eLocation ID:
1 to 3
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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