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Title: Full-stack, real-system quantum computer studies: architectural comparisons and design insights
In recent years, Quantum Computing (QC) has progressed to the point where small working prototypes are available for use. Termed Noisy Intermediate-Scale Quantum (NISQ) computers, these prototypes are too small for large benchmarks or even for Quantum Error Correction, but they do have sufficient resources to run small benchmarks, particularly if compiled with optimizations to make use of scarce qubits and limited operation counts and coherence times. QC has not yet, however, settled on a particular preferred device implementation technology, and indeed different NISQ prototypes implement qubits with very different physical approaches and therefore widely-varying device and machine characteristics. Our work performs a full-stack, benchmark-driven hardware-software analysis of QC systems. We evaluate QC architectural possibilities, software-visible gates, and software optimizations to tackle fundamental design questions about gate set choices, communication topology, the factors affecting benchmark performance and compiler optimizations. In order to answer key cross-technology and cross-platform design questions, our work has built the first top-to-bottom toolflow to target different qubit device technologies, including superconducting and trapped ion qubits which are the current QC front-runners. We use our toolflow, TriQ, to conduct real-system measurements on 7 running QC prototypes from 3 different groups, IBM, Rigetti, and University of Maryland. From more » these real-system experiences at QC's hardware-software interface, we make observations about native and software-visible gates for different QC technologies, communication topologies, and the value of noise-aware compilation even on lower-noise platforms. This is the largest cross-platform real-system QC study performed thus far; its results have the potential to inform both QC device and compiler design going forward. « less
Authors:
; ; ; ; ;
Award ID(s):
1730449 1730082
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10126136
Journal Name:
46th Annual International Symposium on Computer Architecture (ISCA)
Page Range or eLocation-ID:
527 to 540
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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