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Title: Unsupervised Dictionary Learning via a Spiking Locally Competitive Algorithm
A new class of neuromorphic processors promises to provide fast and power-efficient execution of spiking neural networks with on-chip synaptic plasticity. This efficiency derives in part from the fine-grained parallelism as well as event-driven communication mediated by spatially and temporally sparse spike messages. Another source of efficiency arises from the close spatial proximity between synapses and the sites where their weights are applied and updated. This proximity of compute and memory elements drastically reduces expensive data movements but imposes the constraint that only local operations can be efficiently performed, similar to constraints present in biological neural circuits. Efficient weight update operations should therefore only depend on information available locally at each synapse as non-local operations that involve copying, taking a transpose, or normalizing an entire weight matrix are not efficiently supported by present neuromorphic architectures. Moreover, spikes are typically non-negative events, which imposes additional constraints on how local weight update operations can be performed. The Locally Competitive Algorithm (LCA) is a dynamical sparse solver that uses only local computations between non-spiking leaky integrator neurons, allowing for massively parallel implementations on compatible neuromorphic architectures such as Intel's Loihi research chip. It has been previously demonstrated that non-spiking LCA can be used to learn dictionaries of convolutional kernels in an unsupervised manner from raw, unlabeled input, although only by employing non-local computation and signed non-spiking outputs. Here, we show how unsupervised dictionary learning with spiking LCA (S-LCA) can be implemented using only local computation and unsigned spike events, providing a promising strategy for constructing self-organizing neuromorphic chips.  more » « less
Award ID(s):
1734980
NSF-PAR ID:
10126891
Author(s) / Creator(s):
; ; ; ; ;
Date Published:
Journal Name:
ICONS 19: Proceedings of the International Conference on Neuromorphic Systems
Issue:
11
Page Range / eLocation ID:
1 to 5
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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