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Title: Cost-Performance Trade-Offs in Fog Computing for IoT Data Processing of Social Virtual Reality
Virtual Reality (VR)-based Learning Environments (VRLEs) are gaining popularity due to the wide availability of cloud and its edge (a.k.a. fog) technologies and high-speed networks. Thus, there is a need to investigate Internet-of-Things (IoT)-based application design concepts within social VRLEs to offer scalable, cost-efficient services that adapt to dynamic cloud/fog system conditions. In this paper, we investigate the costperformance trade-offs for an IoT-based application that integrates large-scale sensor data from Social VRLEs and coordinates the real-time data processing and visualization across cloud/fog platforms. To facilitate dynamic performance adaptation of the IoT-based application with increased user scale, we present a set of cost-aware adaptive control rules. The implementation of the rules is based on an analytical queuing model that determines the performance states of the IoT-based application, given the current workload and the allocated cloud/fog resources. Using the IoTbased application in an exemplar VRLE use case, we evaluate the cost-performance trade-offs with three system architectures i.e., cloud-only, edge-only and edge-cloud architectures. Experiment results illustrate the best/worst practices in the cost-performance trade-offs for a range of simulated IoT scenarios involving monitoring user emotional data collected by using brain sensors. Our results also detail the impact of the system architecture selection, and the benefits in enabling feedback about student emotions to instructors during Social VR learning sessions. Lastly, we show the benefits of integrating our model-based feedback control in maximizing IoT-based application performance while keeping the associated costs at a minimum level.  more » « less
Award ID(s):
1647213
NSF-PAR ID:
10139887
Author(s) / Creator(s):
Date Published:
Journal Name:
2019 IEEE International Conference on Fog Computing (ICFC)
Page Range / eLocation ID:
134-143
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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