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Title: Physics-based Scene-level Reasoning for Object Pose Estimation in Clutter
This paper focuses on vision-based pose estimation for multiple rigid objects placed in clutter, especially in cases involving occlusions and objects resting on each other. Progress has been achieved recently in object recognition given advancements in deep learning. Nevertheless, such tools typically require a large amount of training data and significant manual effort to label objects. This limits their applicability in robotics, where solutions must scale to a large number of objects and variety of conditions. Moreover, the combinatorial nature of the scenes that could arise from the placement of multiple objects is hard to capture in the training dataset. Thus, the learned models might not produce the desired level of precision required for tasks, such as robotic manipulation. This work proposes an autonomous process for pose estimation that spans from data generation to scene-level reasoning and self-learning. In particular, the proposed framework first generates a labeled dataset for training a Convolutional Neural Network (CNN) for object detection in clutter. These detections are used to guide a scene-level optimization process, which considers the interactions between the different objects present in the clutter to output pose estimates of high precision. Furthermore, confident estimates are used to label online real images from multiple views and re-train the process in a self-learning pipeline. Experimental results indicate that this process is quickly able to identify in cluttered scenes physically-consistent object poses that are more precise than the ones found by reasoning over individual instances of objects. Furthermore, the quality of pose estimates increases over time given the self-learning process.  more » « less
Award ID(s):
1723869 1734492
NSF-PAR ID:
10144831
Author(s) / Creator(s):
; ;
Date Published:
Journal Name:
The international journal of robotics research
ISSN:
0278-3649
Page Range / eLocation ID:
1-22
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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