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Title: Sex Differences in Mate Preferences Across 45 Countries: A Large-Scale Replication
Considerable research has examined human mate preferences across cultures, finding universal sex differences in preferences for attractiveness and resources as well as sources of systematic cultural variation. Two competing perspectives—an evolutionary psychological perspective and a biosocial role perspective—offer alternative explanations for these findings. However, the original data on which each perspective relies are decades old, and the literature is fraught with conflicting methods, analyses, results, and conclusions. Using a new 45-country sample ( N = 14,399), we attempted to replicate classic studies and test both the evolutionary and biosocial role perspectives. Support for universal sex differences in preferences remains robust: Men, more than women, prefer attractive, young mates, and women, more than men, prefer older mates with financial prospects. Cross-culturally, both sexes have mates closer to their own ages as gender equality increases. Beyond age of partner, neither pathogen prevalence nor gender equality robustly predicted sex differences or preferences across countries.
Authors:
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Award ID(s):
1845586
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10145174
Journal Name:
Psychological Science
Volume:
31
Issue:
4
Page Range or eLocation-ID:
408 to 423
ISSN:
0956-7976
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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