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Title: Soliton Frequency Combs in Dual Microresonators
We study soliton frequency combs generated in dual microresonators with different group velocity dispersion. We obtain stable bright and dark solitons at different pump amplitudes.
Authors:
;
Award ID(s):
1807272
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10147622
Journal Name:
Frontiers in Optics 2019
Page Range or eLocation-ID:
JTu4A.118
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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