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Title: Enhancing spin-orbit torque by strong interfacial scattering from ultra-thin insertion layers
Increasing dampinglike spin-orbit torque (SOT) is both of fundamental importance for enabling new research into spintronics phenomena and also technologically urgent for advancing low-power spin-torque memory, logic, and oscillator devices. Here, we demonstrate that enhancing interfacial scattering by inserting ultra-thin layers within a spin Hall metals with intrinsic or side-jump mechanisms can significantly enhance the spin Hall ratio. The dampinglike SOT was enhanced by a factor of 2 via sub-monolayer Hf insertion, as evidenced by both harmonic response measurements and current- induced switching of in-plane magnetized magnetic memory devices with the record low critical switching current of ~73 μA (switching current density ≈ 3.6×106 A/cm2). This work demonstrates a very effective strategy for maximizing dampinglike SOT for low-power spin-torque devices.
Authors:
Award ID(s):
1719875
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10149176
Page Range or eLocation-ID:
1-5
ISSN:
1575-0000
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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