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Title: An iron ketimide single-molecule magnet [Fe 4 (NCPh 2 ) 6 ] with suppressed through-barrier relaxation
Reaction of FeBr 2 with 1.5 equiv. of LiNCPh 2 and 2 equiv. of Zn, in THF, results in the formation of the tetrametallic iron ketimide cluster [Fe 4 (NCPh 2 ) 6 ] ( 1 ) in moderate yield. Formally, two Fe centers in 1 are Fe( i ) and two are Fe( ii ); however, Mössbauer spectroscopy and SQUID magnetometry suggests that the [Fe 4 ] 6+ core of 1 exhibits complete valence electron delocalization, with a thermally-persistent spin ground state of S = 7. AC and DC SQUID magnetometry reveals the presence of slow magnetic relaxation in 1 , indicative of single-molecule magnetic (SMM) behaviour with a relaxation barrier of U eff = 29 cm −1 . Remarkably, very little quantum tunnelling or Raman relaxation is observed down to 1.8 K, which leads to an open hysteresis loop and long relaxation times (up to 34 s at 1.8 K and zero field and 440 s at 1.67 kOe). These results suggest that transition metal ketimide clusters represent a promising avenue to create long-lifetime single molecule magnets.
Authors:
; ; ; ; ;
Award ID(s):
1764345
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10149782
Journal Name:
Chemical Science
ISSN:
2041-6520
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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