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Title: Design thinking, fast and slow: A framework for Kahneman’s dual-system theory in design
In his book Thinking, Fast and Slow , Daniel Kahneman presented a model of human cognition based on two modes or ‘systems’ of thinking: system 1 thinking that is fast and intuitive and system 2 thinking that is slow and tedious. This paper proposes a framework for applying Kahneman’s model to designing based on the function–behaviour–structure ontology. It casts four instances of designing in this framework: design fixation, case-based design, pattern-language-based design and brainstorming.  more » « less
Award ID(s):
1762415
NSF-PAR ID:
10174850
Author(s) / Creator(s):
;
Date Published:
Journal Name:
Design Science
Volume:
5
ISSN:
2053-4701
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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