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Title: Drawing Shortest Paths in Geodetic Graphs
Motivated by the fact that in a space where shortest paths are unique, no two shortest paths meet twice, we study a question posed by Greg Bodwin: Given a geodetic graph G, i.e., an unweighted graph in which the shortest path between any pair of vertices is unique, is there a philogeodetic drawing of G, i.e., a drawing of G in which the curves of any two shortest paths meet at most once? We answer this question in the negative by showing the existence of geodetic graphs that require some pair of shortest paths to cross at least four times. The bound on the number of crossings is tight for the class of graphs we construct. Furthermore, we exhibit geodetic graphs of diameter two that do not admit a philogeodetic drawing.
Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ;
Award ID(s):
1712119 1839274 1740858
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10179482
Journal Name:
28th International Symposium on Graph Drawing and Network Visualization (GD)
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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