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Title: Realization Problems on Reachability Sequences
The classical Erdös-Gallai theorem kicked off the study ofgraph realizability by characterizing degree sequences. We extend this line of research by investigating realizability of directed acyclic graphs (DAGs)given both a local constraint via degree sequences and a global constraint via a sequence of reachability values (number of nodes reachable from a given node). We show that, without degree constraints, DAG reachability realization is solvable in linear time, whereas it is strongly NP-complete given upper bounds on in-degree or out-degree. After defining a suitable notion of bicriteria approximation based on consistency, we give two approximation algorithms achieving O(logn)-reachability consistency and O(logn)-degree consistency; the first, randomized, uses LP (Linear Program) rounding, while the second, deterministic, employs ak-setpacking heuristic. We end with two conjectures that we hope motivate further study of realizability with reachability constraints.
Authors:
; ;
Award ID(s):
1718286
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10183166
Journal Name:
COCOON
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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