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Title: Designing a Collaborative Game-Based Learning Environment for AI-Infused Inquiry Learning in Elementary School Classrooms
Recent years have seen growing recognition of the importance of enabling K-12 students to learn computer science. Meanwhile, artificial intelligence, a field of computer science, has with the potential to profoundly reshape society. This has generated increasing demand for fostering an AI-literate populace. However, there is little work exploring how to introduce K-12 students to AI and how to support K-12 teachers in integrating AI into their classrooms. In this work, we explore how to introduce AI learning experiences into upper elementary classrooms (student ages 8 to 11). With a focus on integrating AI and life science, we present initial work on a collaborative game-based learning environment that features rich problem-based learning scenarios that enable students to gain experience with AI applied toward solving real-world life-science problems.
Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ;
Award ID(s):
1934153 1934128
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10188722
Journal Name:
Proceedings of the 2020 ACM Conference on Innovation and Technology in Computer Science Education
Page Range or eLocation-ID:
566 to 566
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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