skip to main content

Title: Measuring Disease Similarity Based on Multiple Heterogeneous Disease Information Networks
Quantifying the similarities between diseases is now playing an important role in biology and medicine, which provides reliable reference information in finding similar diseases. Most of the previous methods for similarity calculation between diseases either use a single-source data or do not fully utilize multi-sources data. In this study, we propose an approach to measure disease similarity by utilizing multiple heterogeneous disease information networks. Firstly, multiple disease-related data sources are formulated as heterogeneous disease information networks which include various types of objects such as disease, pathway, and chemicals. Then, the corresponding subgraphs of these heterogeneous disease information networks are obtained by filtering vertices. Topological scores and semantics scores are calculated in these heterogenous subgraphs using Dynamic Time Warping (DTW) algorithm and meta path method respectively. In this way, we transform multiple heterogeneous disease networks to a homogeneous disease network with different weights on the edges. Finally, the disease nodes can be embedded according to the weights and the similarity between diseases can then be calculated using these n-dimensional vectors. Experiments based on benchmark set fully demonstrate the effectiveness of our method in measuring the similarity of diseases through multisources data. Index Terms
Authors:
Award ID(s):
1815256
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10189582
Journal Name:
2019 IEEE International Conference on Bioinformatics and Biomedicine (BIBM)
Page Range or eLocation-ID:
228-231
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
More Like this
  1. Parkinson's Disease (PD) is one of the most prevalent neurodegenerative diseases that affects tens of millions of Americans. PD is highly progressive and heterogeneous. Quite a few studies have been conducted in recent years on predictive or disease progression modeling of PD using clinical and biomarkers data. Neuroimaging, as another important information source for neurodegenerative disease, has also arisen considerable interests from the PD community. In this paper, we propose a deep learning method based on Graph Convolutional Networks (GCN) for fusing multiple modalities of brain images in relationship prediction which is useful for distinguishing PD cases from controls. On Parkinson's Progression Markers Initiative (PPMI) cohort, our approach achieved 0.9537±0.0587 AUC, compared with 0.6443±0.0223 AUC achieved by traditional approaches such as PCA.
  2. With the wide application of electronic health records (EHR) in healthcare facilities, health event prediction with deep learning has gained more and more attention. A common feature of EHR data used for deep-learning-based predictions is historical diagnoses. Existing work mainly regards a diagnosis as an independent disease and does not consider clinical relations among diseases in a visit. Many machine learning approaches assume disease representations are static in different visits of a patient. However, in real practice, multiple diseases that are frequently diagnosed at the same time reflect hidden patterns that are conducive to prognosis. Moreover, the development of a disease is not static since some diseases can emerge or disappear and show various symptoms in different visits of a patient. To effectively utilize this combinational disease information and explore the dynamics of diseases, we propose a novel context-aware learning framework using transition functions on dynamic disease graphs. Specifically, we construct a global disease co-occurrence graph with multiple node properties for disease combinations. We design dynamic subgraphs for each patient's visit to leverage global and local contexts. We further define three diagnosis roles in each visit based on the variation of node properties to model disease transition processes. Experimental resultsmore »on two real-world EHR datasets show that the proposed model outperforms state of the art in predicting health events.« less
  3. Valencia, Alfonso (Ed.)
    Abstract Motivation Protein function prediction, based on the patterns of connection in a protein–protein interaction (or association) network, is perhaps the most studied of the classical, fundamental inference problems for biological networks. A highly successful set of recent approaches use random walk-based low-dimensional embeddings that tend to place functionally similar proteins into coherent spatial regions. However, these approaches lose valuable local graph structure from the network when considering only the embedding. We introduce GLIDER, a method that replaces a protein–protein interaction or association network with a new graph-based similarity network. GLIDER is based on a variant of our previous GLIDE method, which was designed to predict missing links in protein–protein association networks, capturing implicit local and global (i.e. embedding-based) graph properties. Results GLIDER outperforms competing methods on the task of predicting GO functional labels in cross-validation on a heterogeneous collection of four human protein–protein association networks derived from the 2016 DREAM Disease Module Identification Challenge, and also on three different protein–protein association networks built from the STRING database. We show that this is due to the strong functional enrichment that is present in the local GLIDER neighborhood in multiple different types of protein–protein association networks. Furthermore, we introduce the GLIDERmore »graph neighborhood as a way for biologists to visualize the local neighborhood of a disease gene. As an application, we look at the local GLIDER neighborhoods of a set of known Parkinson’s Disease GWAS genes, rediscover many genes which have known involvement in Parkinson’s disease pathways, plus suggest some new genes to study. Availability and implementation All code is publicly available and can be accessed here: https://github.com/kap-devkota/GLIDER. Supplementary information Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.« less
  4. Off-label drug use refers to using marketed drugs for indications that are not listed in their FDA labeling information. Such uses are very common and sometimes inevitable in clinical practice. To some extent, off-label drug uses provide a pathway for clinical innovation, however, they could cause serious adverse effects due to lacking scientific research and tests. Since identifying the off-label uses can provide a clue to the stakeholders including healthcare providers, patients, and medication manufacturers to further the investigation on drug efficacy and safety, it raises the demand for a systematic way to detect off-label uses. Given data contributed by health consumers in online health communities (OHCs), we developed an automated approach to detect off-label drug uses based on heterogeneous network mining. We constructed a heterogeneous healthcare network with medical entities (e.g. disease, drug, adverse drug reaction) mined from the text corpus, which involved 50 diseases, 1,297 drugs, and 185 ADRs, and determined 13 meta paths between the drugs and diseases. We developed three metrics to represent the meta-path-based topological features. With the network features, we trained the binary classifiers built on Random Forest algorithm to recognize the known drug-disease associations. The best classification model that used lift to measuremore »path weights obtained F1-score of 0.87, based on which, we identified 1,009 candidates of off-label drug uses and examined their potential by searching evidence from PubMed and FAERS.« less
  5. Martelli, Pier Luigi (Ed.)
    Abstract Motivation Transferring knowledge between species is challenging: different species contain distinct proteomes and cellular architectures, which cause their proteins to carry out different functions via different interaction networks. Many approaches to protein functional annotation use sequence similarity to transfer knowledge between species. These approaches cannot produce accurate predictions for proteins without homologues of known function, as many functions require cellular context for meaningful prediction. To supply this context, network-based methods use protein-protein interaction (PPI) networks as a source of information for inferring protein function and have demonstrated promising results in function prediction. However, most of these methods are tied to a network for a single species, and many species lack biological networks. Results In this work, we integrate sequence and network information across multiple species by computing IsoRank similarity scores to create a meta-network profile of the proteins of multiple species. We use this integrated multispecies meta-network as input to train a maxout neural network with Gene Ontology terms as target labels. Our multispecies approach takes advantage of more training examples, and consequently leads to significant improvements in function prediction performance compared to two network-based methods, a deep learning sequence-based method and the BLAST annotation method used in themore »Critial Assessment of Functional Annotation. We are able to demonstrate that our approach performs well even in cases where a species has no network information available: when an organism’s PPI network is left out we can use our multi-species method to make predictions for the left-out organism with good performance. Availability and implementation The code is freely available at https://github.com/nowittynamesleft/NetQuilt. The data, including sequences, PPI networks and GO annotations are available at https://string-db.org/. Supplementary information Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.« less