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Title: ASSISTments Longitudinal Data Mining Competition Special Issue: A Preface.
This special issue includes papers from some of the leading competitors in the ASSISTments Longitudinal Data Mining Competition 2017, as well as some research from non-competitors, using the same data set. In this competition, participants attempted to predict whether students would choose a career in a STEM field or not, making this prediction using a click-stream dataset from middle school students working on math assignments inside ASSISTments, an online tutoring platform. At the conclusion of the competition on December 3rd, 2017, there were 202 participants, 74 of whom submitted predictions at least once. In this special issue, some of the leading competitors present their results and what they have learned about the link between behavior in online learning and future STEM career development.
Authors:
; ;
Award ID(s):
1636847 1661987 1931523 1724889 1931419
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10190344
Journal Name:
Journal of educational data mining
Volume:
12
Issue:
2
Page Range or eLocation-ID:
I-Xi
ISSN:
2157-2100
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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