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Title: Binary Quilting to Generate Patched Executables without Compilation
When applying patches, or dealing with legacy software, users are often reluctant to change the production executables for fear of unwanted side effects. This results in many active systems running vulnerable or buggy code even though the problems have already been identified and resolved by developers. Furthermore when dealing with old or proprietary software, users can't view or compile source code so any attempts to change the application after distribution requires binary level manipulation. We present a new technique we call binary quilting that allows users to apply the designated minimum patch that preserves core semantics without fear of unwanted side effects introduced either by the build process or by additional code changes. Unlike hot patching, binary quilting is a one-time procedure that creates an entirely new reusable binary. Our case studies show the efficacy of this technique on real software in real patching scenarios.  more » « less
Award ID(s):
1842456 1815494 1563555
NSF-PAR ID:
10190345
Author(s) / Creator(s):
;
Date Published:
Journal Name:
2020 ACM Workshop on Forming an Ecosystem Around Software Transformation
Page Range / eLocation ID:
3 to 8
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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