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Title: Evaluation of an Automatically-Constructed Graph-Based Representation for Interactive Narrative
Interactivity and player experience are inextricably entwined with the creation of compelling narratives for interactive digital media. Narrative shapes and buttresses many such experiences, and therefore designers must construct compelling narrative arcs while carefully considering the effects of interaction on both the story and the player. As the narrative becomes more structurally complex, due to choice-based branching and other player actions, designers need to employ commensurately capable models and visualizations to keep track of that growing complexity. However, previous models of interactive narrative have failed to fully capture interactive elements with automated, operationalized visualizations. In this paper, we describe an algorithm for automated construction of a framework-driven, graph-based representation of interactive narrative. This representation more fully and transparently models structural and interactive features of the narrative than did prior approaches. We present an initial evaluation of this representation, based on modified cognitive walkthroughs performed by interactive narrative design and research experts from our research team, and we describe the takeaways for future improvement on interactive narrative modeling and analysis.  more » « less
Award ID(s):
1736065
NSF-PAR ID:
10191564
Author(s) / Creator(s):
Date Published:
Journal Name:
Proceedings of the Foundations of Digital Games 2019
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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