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Title: Online Professional Development for High School Computer Science Teachers: Features that Support an Equity-Based Professional Learning Community
A grand challenge of the computer science (CS) for all education movement is the preparation of thousands of teachers with high quality, accessible professional development (PD) that has evidence of improving teacher knowledge and pedagogical practices necessary to support the learning needs of diverse groups of students. While regional PD programs can provide in-person learning opportunities, geographic and time constraints often inhibit participation. This article shares findings from an online PD program modified from the existing in-person exploring computer science PD program to provide teachers a facilitated online learning community model to support their first year teaching the course. The findings from this study have implications for future directions in the CS education field, indicating that this model of online PD, heavily based on shared experience among participants, can increase CS teachers’ confidence in adapting and delivering lessons designed to be engaging and accessible to all students.  more » « less
Award ID(s):
1640117
NSF-PAR ID:
10191723
Author(s) / Creator(s):
Date Published:
Journal Name:
Computing in science engineering
Volume:
22
Issue:
5
ISSN:
1521-9615
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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