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Title: Microwave-specific acceleration of a retro-Diels–Alder reaction
A high-temperature retro-Diels–Alder reaction is accelerated by microwave (MW) heating to rates higher than expected based on Arrhenius kinetics and the measured temperature of the reaction mixture. Observations are consistent with selective MW heating of the polar reactant relative to other, less polar components of the reaction mixture.
Authors:
; ;
Award ID(s):
1665029
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10198163
Journal Name:
Chemical Communications
Volume:
56
Issue:
76
Page Range or eLocation-ID:
11247 to 11250
ISSN:
1359-7345
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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