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Title: A View-Adversarial Framework for Multi-View Network Embedding
Network embedding has demonstrated effective empirical performance for various network mining tasks such as node classification, link prediction, clustering, and anomaly detection. However, most of these algorithms focus on the single-view network scenario. From a real-world perspective, one individual node can have different connectivity patterns in different networks. For example, one user can have different relationships on Twitter, Facebook, and LinkedIn due to varying user behaviors on different platforms. In this case, jointly considering the structural information from multiple platforms (i.e., multiple views) can potentially lead to more comprehensive node representations, and eliminate noises and bias from a single view. In this paper, we propose a view-adversarial framework to generate comprehensive and robust multi-view network representations named VANE, which is based on two adversarial games. The first adversarial game enhances the comprehensiveness of the node representation by discriminating the view information which is obtained from the subgraph induced by neighbors of that node. The second adversarial game improves the robustness of the node representation with the challenging of fake node representations from the generative adversarial net. We conduct extensive experiments on downstream tasks with real-world multi-view networks, which shows that our proposed VANE framework significantly outperforms other baseline methods.
Authors:
Award ID(s):
1939725 1947135
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10200241
Journal Name:
CIKM '20: Proceedings of the 29th ACM International Conference on Information & Knowledge
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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