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Title: Blocking the Propagation of Two Simultaneous Contagions over Networks
We consider the simultaneous propagation of two contagions over a social network. We assume a threshold model for the propagation of the two contagions and use the formal framework of discrete dynamical systems. In particular, we study an optimization problem where the goal is to minimize the total number of infected nodes subject to a budget constraint on the total number of nodes that can be vaccinated. While this problem has been considered in the literature for a single contagion, our work considers the simultaneous propagation of two contagions. Since the optimization problem is NP-hard, we develop a heuristic based on a generalization of the set cover problem. Using experiments on three real-world networks, we compare the performance of the heuristic with some baseline methods.
Authors:
; ; ; ;
Award ID(s):
1916670
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10203995
Journal Name:
International Conference on Complex Networks and their Applications (Complex Networks)
Page Range or eLocation-ID:
1-12
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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