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This content will become publicly available on December 1, 2022

Title: High-throughput reaction engineering to assess the oxidation stability of MAX phases
Abstract The resistance to oxidizing environments exhibited by some M n+1 AX n (MAX) phases stems from the formation of stable and protective oxide layers at high operating temperatures. The MAX phases are hexagonally arranged layered nitrides or carbides with general formula M n +1 AX n , n  = 1, 2, 3, where M is early transition elements, A is A block elements, and X is C/N. Previous attempts to model and assess oxide phase stability in these systems has been limited in scope due to higher computational costs. To address the issue, we developed a machine-learning driven high-throughput framework for the fast assessment of phase stability and oxygen reactivity of 211 chemistry MAX phase M 2 AX. The proposed scheme combines a sure independence screening sparsifying operator-based machine-learning model in combination with grand-canonical linear programming to assess temperature-dependent Gibbs free energies, reaction products, and elemental chemical activity during the oxidation of MAX phases. The thermodynamic stability, and chemical activity of constituent elements of Ti 2 AlC with respect to oxygen were fully assessed to understand the high-temperature oxidation behavior. The predictions are in good agreement with oxidation experiments performed on Ti 2 AlC. We were also able to explain more » the metastability of Ti 2 SiC, which could not be synthesized experimentally due to higher stability of competing phases. For generality of the proposed approach, we discuss the oxidation mechanism of Cr 2 AlC. The insights of oxidation behavior will enable more efficient design and accelerated discovery of MAX phases with maintained performance in oxidizing environments at high temperatures. « less
Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ;
Award ID(s):
1852535
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10216526
Journal Name:
npj Computational Materials
Volume:
7
Issue:
1
ISSN:
2057-3960
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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