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Title: Real-Time Operating Systems for Cyber-Physical Systems: Current Status and Future Research
This paper studies the current status and future directions of RTOS (Real-Time Operating Systems) for time-sensitive CPS (Cyber-Physical Systems). GPOS (General Purpose Operating Systems) existed before RTOS but did not meet performance requirements for time sensitive CPS. Many GPOS have put forward adaptations to meet the requirements of real-time performance, and this paper compares RTOS and GPOS and shows their pros and cons for CPS applications. Furthermore, comparisons among select RTOS such as VxWorks, RTLinux, and FreeRTOS have been conducted in terms of scheduling, kernel, and priority inversion. Various tools for WCET (Worst-Case Execution Time) estimation are discussed. This paper also presents a CPS use case of RTOS, i.e. JetOS for avionics, and future advancements in RTOS such as multi-core RTOS, new RTOS architecture and RTOS security for CPS.
Authors:
;
Award ID(s):
1757787 1646458 2146968
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10232379
Journal Name:
IEEE International Conference on Cyber Physical and Social Computing (CPSCom-2020)
Volume:
1
Page Range or eLocation-ID:
419 - 425
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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