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Title: Developing Highway Capacity Manual Capacity Adjustment Factors for Connected and Automated Traffic on Freeway Segments
Connected and automated vehicles (CAVs) will undoubtedly transform many aspects of transportation systems in the future. In the meantime, transportation agencies must make investment and policy decisions to address the future needs of the transportation system. This research provides much-needed guidance for agencies about planning-level capacities in a CAV future and quantify Highway Capacity Manual (HCM) capacities as a function of CAV penetration rates and vehicle behaviors such as car-following, lane change, and merge. As a result of numerous uncertainties on CAV implementation policies, the study considers many scenarios including variations in parameters (including CAV gap/headway settings), roadway geometry, and traffic characteristics. More specifically, this study considers basic freeway, freeway merge, and freeway weaving segments in which various simulation scenarios are evaluated using two major CAV applications: cooperative adaptive cruise control and advanced merging. Data from microscopic traffic simulation are collected to develop capacity adjustment factors for CAVs. Results show that the existence of CAVs in the traffic stream can significantly enhance the roadway capacity (by as much as 35% to 40% under certain cases), not only on basic freeways but also on merge and weaving segments, as the CAV market penetration rate increases. The human driver behavior of baseline more » traffic also affects the capacity benefits, particularly at lower CAV market penetration rates. Finally, tables of capacity adjustment factors and corresponding regression models are developed for HCM implementation of the results of this study. « less
Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ;
Award ID(s):
2054710
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10248497
Journal Name:
Transportation Research Record: Journal of the Transportation Research Board
Volume:
2674
Issue:
10
Page Range or eLocation-ID:
401 to 415
ISSN:
0361-1981
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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