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Title: Simulation of the effects of forest harvesting under changing climate to inform long-term sustainable forest management using a biogeochemical model
Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ;
Award ID(s):
1907683 1637685
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10252131
Journal Name:
Science of The Total Environment
Volume:
767
Issue:
C
Page Range or eLocation-ID:
144881
ISSN:
0048-9697
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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