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Title: A Reactive Autonomous Camera System for the RAVEN II Surgical Robot
The endoscopic camera of a surgical robot pro- vides surgeons with a magnified 3D view of the surgical field, but repositioning it increases mental workload and operation time. Poor camera placement contributes to safety-critical events when surgical tools move out of the view of the camera. This paper presents a proof of concept of an autonomous camera system for the Raven II surgical robot that aims to reduce surgeon workload and improve safety by providing an optimal view of the workspace showing all objects of interest. This system uses transfer learning to localize and classify objects of interest within the view of a stereoscopic camera. The positions and centroid of the objects are estimated and a set of control rules determines the movement of the camera towards a more desired view. Our perception module had an accuracy of 61.21% overall for identifying objects of interest and was able to localize both graspers and multiple blocks in the environment. Comparison of the commands proposed by our system with the desired commands from a survey of 13 participants indicates that the autonomous camera system proposes appropriate movements for the tilt and pan of the camera.
Authors:
; ; ;
Award ID(s):
1829004
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10257276
Journal Name:
2020 International Symposium on Medical Robotics (ISMR)
Page Range or eLocation-ID:
195 to 201
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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