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Title: Designing for an integrated STEM+C experience
In this paper we present an integrated design approach for bridging content between science, technology, engineering, math, and computational thinking (STEM+C). We present data from a design experiment to show examples of the kinds of integrated reasoning that students exhibited while engaging with our design. We argue that covariational reasoning can provide strong scaffolding in making integrated connections between the STEM+C content areas.  more » « less
Award ID(s):
1742125
NSF-PAR ID:
10272338
Author(s) / Creator(s):
;
Editor(s):
Sacristán, A.I; Cortés-Zavala, J.C.; Ruiz-Arias, P.M.
Date Published:
Journal Name:
Mathematics Education Across Cultures: Proceedings of the 42nd Meeting of the North American Chapter of the International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education
Page Range / eLocation ID:
2233-2237
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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