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Title: Design of a Laboratory Scale Solar Microgrid Cyber-Physical System for Education
Renewable energy sources such as solar and wind provide an effective solution for reducing dependency on conventional power generation and increasing the reliability and quality of power systems. Presented in this paper are design and implementation of a laboratory scale solar microgrid cyber-physical system (CPS) with wireless data monitoring as a teaching tool in the engineering technology curriculum. In the system, the solar panel, battery, charge controller, and loads form the physical layer, while the sensors, communication networks, supervisory control and data acquisition systems (SCADA) and control systems form the cyber layer. The physical layer was seamlessly integrated with the cyber layer consisting of control and communication. The objective was to create a robust CPS platform and to use the system to promote interest in and knowledge of renewable energy among university students. Experimental results showed that the maximum power point tracking (MPPT) charge controller provided the loads with power from the solar panel and used additional power to charge the rechargeable battery. Through the system, students learned and mastered key concepts and knowledge of multi-disciplinary areas including data sampling and acquisition, analog to digital conversion, solar power, battery charging, control, embedded systems and software programing. It is a valuable more » teaching resource for students to study renewable energy in CPS. « less
Authors:
;
Award ID(s):
1712146
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10272351
Journal Name:
Electronics
Volume:
10
Issue:
13
Page Range or eLocation-ID:
1562
ISSN:
2079-9292
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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